COIN-OR::LEMON - Graph Library

source: lemon-0.x/src/work/peter/gtk-helloworld.cc @ 1174:5dccf1916ed8

Last change on this file since 1174:5dccf1916ed8 was 1174:5dccf1916ed8, checked in by Hegyi Péter, 15 years ago

just kidding

File size: 3.4 KB
Line 
1#include <gtk/gtk.h>
2
3/* This is a callback function. The data arguments are ignored
4 * in this example. More on callbacks below. */
5static void hello( GtkWidget *widget,
6                   gpointer   data )
7{
8    g_print ("Hello World\n");
9}
10
11static gboolean delete_event( GtkWidget *widget,
12                              GdkEvent  *event,
13                              gpointer   data )
14{
15    /* If you return FALSE in the "delete_event" signal handler,
16     * GTK will emit the "destroy" signal. Returning TRUE means
17     * you don't want the window to be destroyed.
18     * This is useful for popping up 'are you sure you want to quit?'
19     * type dialogs. */
20
21    g_print ("delete event occurred\n");
22
23    /* Change TRUE to FALSE and the main window will be destroyed with
24     * a "delete_event". */
25
26    return TRUE;
27}
28
29/* Another callback */
30static void destroy( GtkWidget *widget,
31                     gpointer   data )
32{
33    gtk_main_quit ();
34}
35
36int main( int   argc,
37          char *argv[] )
38{
39    /* GtkWidget is the storage type for widgets */
40    GtkWidget *window;
41    GtkWidget *button;
42   
43    /* This is called in all GTK applications. Arguments are parsed
44     * from the command line and are returned to the application. */
45    gtk_init (&argc, &argv);
46   
47    /* create a new window */
48    window = gtk_window_new (GTK_WINDOW_TOPLEVEL);
49   
50    /* When the window is given the "delete_event" signal (this is given
51     * by the window manager, usually by the "close" option, or on the
52     * titlebar), we ask it to call the delete_event () function
53     * as defined above. The data passed to the callback
54     * function is NULL and is ignored in the callback function. */
55    g_signal_connect (G_OBJECT (window), "delete_event",
56                      G_CALLBACK (delete_event), NULL);
57   
58    /* Here we connect the "destroy" event to a signal handler. 
59     * This event occurs when we call gtk_widget_destroy() on the window,
60     * or if we return FALSE in the "delete_event" callback. */
61    g_signal_connect (G_OBJECT (window), "destroy",
62                      G_CALLBACK (destroy), NULL);
63   
64    /* Sets the border width of the window. */
65    gtk_container_set_border_width (GTK_CONTAINER (window), 10);
66   
67    /* Creates a new button with the label "Hello World". */
68    button = gtk_button_new_with_label ("Hello World");
69   
70    /* When the button receives the "clicked" signal, it will call the
71     * function hello() passing it NULL as its argument.  The hello()
72     * function is defined above. */
73    g_signal_connect (G_OBJECT (button), "clicked",
74                      G_CALLBACK (hello), NULL);
75   
76    /* This will cause the window to be destroyed by calling
77     * gtk_widget_destroy(window) when "clicked".  Again, the destroy
78     * signal could come from here, or the window manager. */
79    g_signal_connect_swapped (G_OBJECT (button), "clicked",
80                              G_CALLBACK (gtk_widget_destroy),
81                              G_OBJECT (window));
82   
83    /* This packs the button into the window (a gtk container). */
84    gtk_container_add (GTK_CONTAINER (window), button);
85   
86    /* The final step is to display this newly created widget. */
87    gtk_widget_show (button);
88   
89    /* and the window */
90    gtk_widget_show (window);
91   
92    /* All GTK applications must have a gtk_main(). Control ends here
93     * and waits for an event to occur (like a key press or
94     * mouse event). */
95    gtk_main ();
96   
97    return 0;
98}
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