COIN-OR::LEMON - Graph Library

Changeset 1175:6205eebd62fc in lemon-0.x for doc


Ignore:
Timestamp:
02/24/05 18:04:49 (15 years ago)
Author:
athos
Branch:
default
Phase:
public
Convert:
svn:c9d7d8f5-90d6-0310-b91f-818b3a526b0e/lemon/trunk@1581
Message:

Everithing is half-done, but some progress has been made in writing documentation.

Location:
doc
Files:
1 deleted
4 edited

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  • doc/Doxyfile

    r1172 r1175  
    446446
    447447INPUT                  = mainpage.dox \
     448                         getstart.dox \
    448449                         quicktour.dox \
    449450                         demoprograms.dox \
  • doc/demoprograms.dox

    r1170 r1175  
    33\page demoprograms Demo Programs
    44
     5
     6
     7
    58*/
  • doc/getstart.dox

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    22\page getstart How to start using LEMON
    33
     4In this page we detail how to start using LEMON, from downloading it to
     5your computer, through the steps of installation to showing a simple
     6"Hello World" type program that already uses LEMON. If anything is not
     7clear write to our FAQ.
     8
     9\todo Is this FAQ thing a good idea here? Is there such a thing? If
     10twice YES then a link comes here.
     11
     12
     13
     14
    415\section downloadLEMON How to download LEMON
    516
    6 You can download LEMON from ...
     17You can download LEMON from the following web site:
     18
    719
    820\section installLEMON How to install LEMON
     
    1022In order to install LEMON you have to do the following
    1123
     24Ide kell írni:
     25 
     26-Hol fordul (Windows-os fordító nem fordítja, unix/linux alatt gcc hanyas verziója kell)
     27-
     28
    1229\section helloworld My first program using LEMON
    1330
    14 Helloworld program
    15 Link to quicktour
     31If you have installed LEMON on your system you can paste the following code
     32segment into a file to have a first working program that uses library LEMON.
     33
     34\code
     35#include <iostream>
     36#include <lemon/list_graph.h>
     37
     38using namespace lemon;
     39
     40int main()
     41{
     42  typedef ListGraph Graph;
     43  typedef Graph::Edge Edge;
     44  typedef Graph::InEdgeIt InEdgeIt;
     45  typedef Graph::OutEdgeIt OutEdgeIt;
     46  typedef Graph::EdgeIt EdgeIt;
     47  typedef Graph::Node Node;
     48  typedef Graph::NodeIt NodeIt;
     49
     50  Graph g;
     51 
     52  for (int i = 0; i < 3; i++)
     53    g.addNode();
     54 
     55  for (NodeIt i(g); i!=INVALID; ++i)
     56    for (NodeIt j(g); j!=INVALID; ++j)
     57      if (i != j) g.addEdge(i, j);
     58
     59  std::cout << "Nodes:";
     60  for (NodeIt i(g); i!=INVALID; ++i)
     61    std::cout << " " << g.id(i);
     62  std::cout << std::endl;
     63
     64  std::cout << "Edges:";
     65  for (EdgeIt i(g); i!=INVALID; ++i)
     66    std::cout << " (" << g.id(g.source(i)) << "," << g.id(g.target(i)) << ")";
     67  std::cout << std::endl;
     68
     69\endcode
     70
     71
     72ListGraph is one of LEMON's graph classes. It is based on linked lists,
     73therefore iterating throuh its edges and nodes is fast.
     74
     75After some convenient typedefs we create a graph and add three nodes to it.
     76Then we add edges to it to form a complete graph.
     77
     78Then we iterate through all nodes of the graph. We use a constructor of the
     79node iterator to initialize it to the first node. The operator++ is used to
     80step to the next node. Using operator++ on the iterator pointing to the last
     81node invalidates the iterator i.e. sets its value to
     82\ref lemon::INVALID "INVALID". This is what we exploit in the stop condition.
     83
     84We can also iterate through all edges of the graph very similarly. The
     85\c target and
     86\c source member functions can be used to access the endpoints of an edge.
     87
     88The previous code fragment prints out the following:
     89
     90\code
     91Nodes: 2 1 0
     92
     93Edges: (0,2) (1,2) (0,1) (2,1) (1,0) (2,0)
     94\endcode
     95
     96
     97If you want to see more features, go to the \ref quicktour "Quick Tour to
     98LEMON", if you want to see see some demo programs then go to our
     99\ref demoprograms "Demo Programs" page!
    16100
    17101
  • doc/quicktour.dox

    r1170 r1175  
    33\page quicktour Quick Tour to LEMON
    44
     5Let us first answer the question <b>"What do I want to use LEMON for?"
     6</b>.
     7LEMON is a C++ library, so you can use it if you want to write C++
     8programs. What kind of tasks does the library LEMON help to solve?
     9It helps to write programs that solve optimization problems that arise
     10frequently when <b>designing and testing certain networks</b>, for example
     11in telecommunication, computer networks, and other areas that I cannot
     12think of now. A very natural way of modelling these networks is by means
     13of a <b> graph</b> (we will always mean a directed graph by that).
     14So if you want to write a program that works with
     15graphs then you might find it useful to use our library LEMON.
     16
     17
     18
     19Some examples are the following:
     20
     21- First we give two examples that show how to instantiate a graph. The
     22first one shows the methods that add nodes and edges, but one will
     23usually use the second way which reads a graph from a stream (file).
     24
     25
     26-# The following code fragment shows how to fill a graph with data.
     27
     28 \code
     29
     30  typedef ListGraph Graph;
     31  typedef Graph::Edge Edge;
     32  typedef Graph::InEdgeIt InEdgeIt;
     33  typedef Graph::OutEdgeIt OutEdgeIt;
     34  typedef Graph::EdgeIt EdgeIt;
     35  typedef Graph::Node Node;
     36  typedef Graph::NodeIt NodeIt;
     37
     38  Graph g;
     39 
     40  for (int i = 0; i < 3; i++)
     41    g.addNode();
     42 
     43  for (NodeIt i(g); i!=INVALID; ++i)
     44    for (NodeIt j(g); j!=INVALID; ++j)
     45      if (i != j) g.addEdge(i, j);
     46
     47 \endcode
     48
     49 -#
     50
     51- If you want to solve some transportation problems in a network then
     52you will want to find shortest paths between nodes of a graph. This is
     53usually solved using Dijkstra's algorithm. A utility
     54that solves this is  the \ref lemon::Dijkstra "LEMON Dijkstra class".
     55A simple program using the \ref lemon::Dijkstra "LEMON Dijkstra class" is
     56as follows (we assume that the graph is already given in the memory):
     57
     58\code
     59
     60\endcode
     61
     62- If you want to design a network and want to minimize the total length
     63of wires then you might be looking for a <b>minimum spanning tree</b> in
     64an undirected graph. This can be found using the Kruskal algorithm: the
     65class \ref lemon::Kruskal "LEMON Kruskal class" does this job for you.
     66The following code fragment shows an example:
     67
     68\code
     69
     70\endcode
     71
     72
     73
     74Some more detailed introduction can be obtained by following the links
     75below:
     76
    577\ref graphs "Graph structures"
    6 play a central role in LEMON, so if you are new to it,
     78play a central role in LEMON, so if you are new to the library,
    779you probably should start \ref graphs "here".
    8 You can also find that page along with others under
    9 <a class="el" href="pages.html"> Related Pages </a>.
     80(You can also find that page along with others under
     81<a class="el" href="pages.html"> Related Pages </a>.)
    1082
    1183If you are
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